climate change social impacts sustainabilty innovation

Welcome to NISANSA – the joint project by University of Marburg and University of Gießen complements climate change research with regional and social science perspectives, focusing on the Global South. The project investigates which climate change impacts the societies of the Global South (southern Africa and northern South America) are confronted with, which potentials exist to react to them and which implications this has for the global North, Europe and Germany.

The question of adequate social reactions to the consequences of climate change is one of the central challenges for the future.

***SAVE THE DATE: our second international NISANSA-Conference as transdisciplinary forum between NISANSA, ARUA und TSITICA on 13th and 14th of March 2024in Cape Town, South Africa.
Titel: 'Pathways of change in the social response to climate change in unequal societies in Sub-Saharan Africa and Latin America'

The joint project NISANSA complements climate change research with regional and social science perspectives, focusing on the global South. The project investigates which climate change impacts the societies of the global South (southern Africa and northern South America) are confronted with, which potentials exist to respond to them and which implications this has for the global North, Europe and Germany.

Research Interest

Focus on Global South

Southern Africa (Angola, Botswana, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa) 


Northern South America (Brazil, Ecuador, Colombia, Venezuela)

  • What are the consequences of climate change in and for the countries and regions in the Global South?
  • How do they address climate change and its consequences?
  • What are the social implications for these regions, and what possibilities and potential exists to react to them?
  • Which programs and institutional structures are used to address the impacts of climate change?
  • Which practices of sustainable action emerge (sustainability innovation)?
  • And what are the consequences for the Global North, Europe, and Germany?

The joint project between the UMR and the JLU investigates these questions from a transregional and comparative perspective, focusing on Southern Africa and Northern South America. The aim is to generate sound knowledge about the social consequences of climate change in these regions. The project aims systematically complement current climate research with regional and social science perspectives. Natural sciences and statistical climate models primarily characterize climate research. However, climate change is not only a matter of climatological and ecological change, but it also implies political and cultural responses and societal transformations.

In a group of seven subprojects, the interdisciplinary joint project between the Philipps-University of Marburg and the Justus-Liebig-University of Giessen has been investigating these questions in countries in southern Africa (Angola, Botswana, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa) and northern South America (Brazil, Ecuador, Colombia, Venezuela) since July 2021.

Latest News

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Publication

March 2022

Policy Advice Strategies for Climate Change Adaption in International Cooperation with Malawi and Namibia

Sara Lüttich & Matthias Rompel
Teilprojekt 7

SASSCAL_10_years

SASSCAL

April 21st 2022, Windhoek Namibia

SASSCAL to celebrate 10 years of excellence in climate change research



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1st NISANSA to be announced

May 20th 2022

The first NISANSA-Symposium is now set for July 11th 2022 taking place at Philipps-University of Marburg. Further Information will be prvided shortly.

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🟣 Feminism and queer theory have been indispensable in current environmental discussions and practices, and the case of Ecuador is a scenario for this reflection. The voices of women and trans, non-binary or gender fluid people have been minimized and silenced both in decision making and in the scenarios of political participation and discussion.

🤔 To better understand the systems of oppression that determine the role of sexual and gender minorities, it is important to take into account the post-colonial framework and the patriarchal system in which they occur, as these end up contributing to the environmental deterioration of the region. In Ecuador, extractive enclaves have reaffirmed gender roles in which the masculine is constantly reaffirmed while women are relegated to a secondary role in public life, as well as excluded from decision-making in their communities.

🛑 Likewise, the distribution of salaries plays an important role in the gender roles assigned by extractive companies in Ecuador, as it deepens the differences between men and women or other sexual and gender minorities, which in many cases leads to an increase in “machismo” and gender-based violence. This masculinization of the work space in extractive enclaves has also increased dynamics such as prostitution of (Indigenous) women due to their respective loss of economic autonomy.

💡 In sum, the strong masculinization of labor spaces resulting from mining and oil companies has fueled profound gender inequality as well as an environment conducive to gender-based violence and non-binary or fluid identities. As NISANSA we want to remind the importance of environmental struggles to be exercised from a gender perspective for women and minorities.

📷 Resistance and leadership has many faces and forms. Here you see Teresa Alvarado and her granddaughter harvesting cacao in their finca close to Loreto (Orellana).

📖 Sources: see comment below

#nisansadisciplines #nisansaconcepts

🟣 Feminism and queer theory have been indispensable in current environmental discussions and practices, and the case of Ecuador is a scenario for this reflection. The voices of women and trans, non-binary or gender fluid people have been minimized and silenced both in decision making and in the scenarios of political participation and discussion.

🤔 To better understand the systems of oppression that determine the role of sexual and gender minorities, it is important to take into account the post-colonial framework and the patriarchal system in which they occur, as these end up contributing to the environmental deterioration of the region. In Ecuador, extractive enclaves have reaffirmed gender roles in which the masculine is constantly reaffirmed while women are relegated to a secondary role in public life, as well as excluded from decision-making in their communities.

🛑 Likewise, the distribution of salaries plays an important role in the gender roles assigned by extractive companies in Ecuador, as it deepens the differences between men and women or other sexual and gender minorities, which in many cases leads to an increase in “machismo” and gender-based violence. This masculinization of the work space in extractive enclaves has also increased dynamics such as prostitution of (Indigenous) women due to their respective loss of economic autonomy.

💡 In sum, the strong masculinization of labor spaces resulting from mining and oil companies has fueled profound gender inequality as well as an environment conducive to gender-based violence and non-binary or fluid identities. As NISANSA we want to remind the importance of environmental struggles to be exercised from a gender perspective for women and minorities.

📷 Resistance and leadership has many faces and forms. Here you see Teresa Alvarado and her granddaughter harvesting cacao in their finca close to Loreto (Orellana).

📖 Sources: see comment below

#nisansadisciplines #nisansaconcepts
...

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Hello, dear followers! 👋 Today we want to share some exciting updates from our team from Ecuador. 🇪🇨

🤝 Over the past few months, we've been collaborating closely with our amazing colleagues from the Universidad Central del Ecuador (UCE) on various initiatives aimed at advancing our research and sharing valuable insights. One of our recent endeavors has included the launch of a virtual presentation series, where our colleagues and fellows had the fantastic opportunity to share results from their research.

🏙️ In addition to our virtual engagements, we were thrilled to have the chance to meet in person in the beautiful city of Quito! Prof. Stefan Peters and Julia Schwab joined us during their travels to Ecuador in January, and we had incredibly fruitful discussions regarding our further cooperation.

🌿 We were also gearing up for an exciting symposium titled "The Amazon in Transition: Between Extractivism, Climate Change, and Conservation," scheduled to take place from January 19th to 21st, 2024, in the city of El Coca in the Ecuadorian Amazon.

🛑 However, due to the evolving situation and prioritizing the safety of all participants, we made the difficult decision to cancel the event last minute. While this was undoubtedly disappointing for our entire team, we're currently working hard to put together an alternative event that will still allow us to engage with the community.

📢 Stay tuned for more updates on our fellows Fernando Pinzón, Dr. Rony Parra, Jessica Arias and Nadia Combariza in our following posts.

📸 From left to right: Prof. Dr. Stefan Peters, Dr. Gaby Duque, Dr. Freddy Michel, Dr. Natali Cáceres, Julia Schwab and Fidel Rodríguez

#nisansadisciplines #nisansaconcepts #ecuador #uce #universidadcentraldelecuador #climatechange #extractivism #amazon

Hello, dear followers! 👋 Today we want to share some exciting updates from our team from Ecuador. 🇪🇨

🤝 Over the past few months, we`ve been collaborating closely with our amazing colleagues from the Universidad Central del Ecuador (UCE) on various initiatives aimed at advancing our research and sharing valuable insights. One of our recent endeavors has included the launch of a virtual presentation series, where our colleagues and fellows had the fantastic opportunity to share results from their research.

🏙️ In addition to our virtual engagements, we were thrilled to have the chance to meet in person in the beautiful city of Quito! Prof. Stefan Peters and Julia Schwab joined us during their travels to Ecuador in January, and we had incredibly fruitful discussions regarding our further cooperation.

🌿 We were also gearing up for an exciting symposium titled "The Amazon in Transition: Between Extractivism, Climate Change, and Conservation," scheduled to take place from January 19th to 21st, 2024, in the city of El Coca in the Ecuadorian Amazon.

🛑 However, due to the evolving situation and prioritizing the safety of all participants, we made the difficult decision to cancel the event last minute. While this was undoubtedly disappointing for our entire team, we`re currently working hard to put together an alternative event that will still allow us to engage with the community.

📢 Stay tuned for more updates on our fellows Fernando Pinzón, Dr. Rony Parra, Jessica Arias and Nadia Combariza in our following posts.

📸 From left to right: Prof. Dr. Stefan Peters, Dr. Gaby Duque, Dr. Freddy Michel, Dr. Natali Cáceres, Julia Schwab and Fidel Rodríguez

#nisansadisciplines #nisansaconcepts #ecuador #uce #universidadcentraldelecuador #climatechange #extractivism #amazon
...

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Let's dive into the significance of the vote to ban oil extraction from Yasuní National Park🗳️

𝐖𝐡𝐲 𝐘𝐚𝐬𝐮𝐧í 𝐢𝐬 𝐬𝐩𝐞𝐜𝐢𝐚𝐥? The referendum pertains to an oil block that is not only home to Kichwa and Waorani Indigenous communities but is also in proximity to the "untouchable zone," where Tagaeri y Taromenane live in isolation. Additionally, Yasuní is acknowledged as a global biodiversity hotspot, playing a vital role in the fight against climate change. These factors have fueled extensive debates on oil extraction in the area for several years.

𝐖𝐡𝐨 𝐈𝐧𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐕𝐨𝐭𝐞? Approximately a decade ago, with the state announcing plans to expand oil production into Yasuní, the civil society initiative Yasunidos emerged to campaign against oil drilling. Despite successfully gathering enough signatures for a national referendum, the signatures were fraudulently invalidated. The constitutional court condemned this injustice in 2023, leading to the delayed referendum.

𝐖𝐡𝐲 𝐢𝐬 𝐢𝐭 𝐂𝐨𝐦𝐩𝐥𝐞𝐱? Since then, the state initiated oil extraction in Yasuní in 2016, involving as well CSR efforts to secure local support. This altered the focus of the referendum from 𝑤ℎ𝑒𝑡ℎ𝑒𝑟 𝑡𝑜 𝑒𝑥𝑡𝑟𝑎𝑐𝑡 in Yasuní to 𝑐𝑒𝑎𝑠𝑖𝑛𝑔 𝑒𝑥𝑡𝑟𝑎𝑐𝑡𝑖𝑜𝑛. The new dependencies with the oil company influenced local opinions, with the province of Orellana rejecting the referendum by almost 58%.

𝐈𝐬 𝐢𝐭 𝐚 𝐕𝐢𝐜𝐭𝐨𝐫𝐲? While the vote is undeniably significant and represents a democratic call for alternatives to the extractivist development model, it is crucial not to overlook the 40% of the population that did not support the initiative. Investigating this resistance, particularly on a local level, is essential to prevent the silencing of historically marginalized voices. In Julia’s research, an Indigenous organization claims exclusion by Yasunidos and emphasizes the need for acknowledgment as rightful land title holders. They assert that Yasunidos failed to present viable alternatives to oil extraction, disregarding local sentiments in favor of oil extraction in the Yasuní.

#nisansadisciplines #nisansaconcepts #yasuní #ecuador #amazon #yasunidos

Let`s dive into the significance of the vote to ban oil extraction from Yasuní National Park🗳️

𝐖𝐡𝐲 𝐘𝐚𝐬𝐮𝐧í 𝐢𝐬 𝐬𝐩𝐞𝐜𝐢𝐚𝐥? The referendum pertains to an oil block that is not only home to Kichwa and Waorani Indigenous communities but is also in proximity to the "untouchable zone," where Tagaeri y Taromenane live in isolation. Additionally, Yasuní is acknowledged as a global biodiversity hotspot, playing a vital role in the fight against climate change. These factors have fueled extensive debates on oil extraction in the area for several years.

𝐖𝐡𝐨 𝐈𝐧𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐕𝐨𝐭𝐞? Approximately a decade ago, with the state announcing plans to expand oil production into Yasuní, the civil society initiative Yasunidos emerged to campaign against oil drilling. Despite successfully gathering enough signatures for a national referendum, the signatures were fraudulently invalidated. The constitutional court condemned this injustice in 2023, leading to the delayed referendum.

𝐖𝐡𝐲 𝐢𝐬 𝐢𝐭 𝐂𝐨𝐦𝐩𝐥𝐞𝐱? Since then, the state initiated oil extraction in Yasuní in 2016, involving as well CSR efforts to secure local support. This altered the focus of the referendum from 𝑤ℎ𝑒𝑡ℎ𝑒𝑟 𝑡𝑜 𝑒𝑥𝑡𝑟𝑎𝑐𝑡 in Yasuní to 𝑐𝑒𝑎𝑠𝑖𝑛𝑔 𝑒𝑥𝑡𝑟𝑎𝑐𝑡𝑖𝑜𝑛. The new dependencies with the oil company influenced local opinions, with the province of Orellana rejecting the referendum by almost 58%.

𝐈𝐬 𝐢𝐭 𝐚 𝐕𝐢𝐜𝐭𝐨𝐫𝐲? While the vote is undeniably significant and represents a democratic call for alternatives to the extractivist development model, it is crucial not to overlook the 40% of the population that did not support the initiative. Investigating this resistance, particularly on a local level, is essential to prevent the silencing of historically marginalized voices. In Julia’s research, an Indigenous organization claims exclusion by Yasunidos and emphasizes the need for acknowledgment as rightful land title holders. They assert that Yasunidos failed to present viable alternatives to oil extraction, disregarding local sentiments in favor of oil extraction in the Yasuní.

#nisansadisciplines #nisansaconcepts #yasuní #ecuador #amazon #yasunidos
...

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Subproject 5 checking in from Ecuador with a roundup of the past year! 🇪🇨 

😮News has likely reached you about the recently declared 'internal armed conflict' by Ecuadorian President Daniel Noboa, triggered by the escape of two influential drug lords and the forceful takeover of a television station during a live broadcast. This situation, stemming from escalating gang violence, put an end to the time when Ecuador was known as the Island of Peace.

💥In addition to these security challenges, Ecuador confronted a significant political crisis last year, marked by the dissolution of the parliament by former President Guillermo Lasso. This action was widely perceived as an attempt to evade a corruption trial implicating his government in corruption within certain public enterprises.

📢This course of events prompted a call for extraordinary elections on August 20, 2023, which culminated in Daniel Noboa assuming the presidency. The lead-up to these elections witnessed a surge in pre-existing violence, with the most distressing incident being the assassination of presidential candidate Fernando Villavicencio during his campaign on August 9, 2023.

✨Now, the silver lining! Concurrent with the presidential elections, Ecuadorians participated in a referendum on the appropriateness of oil exploration in the Yasuní National Park, a region of vital ecological significance and home to Indigenous peoples in the Ecuadorian Amazon.

🌳The outcome is noteworthy: Ecuadorians voted to cease oil exploration in this region, securing a victory with a majority of 59.14%. This vote holds historic significance, not only for Ecuador but also for the broader Amazon region, especially considering the prevailing environmental degradation and the climate crisis.

🤨Hold the confetti, though. The journey ahead is nuanced. The talk about scrapping oil wells sparks debates on financial viability due to current elevated costs for the military and security. In addition, the initiative also faces local resistance. 

👋Stay tuned for our next post diving deeper into the Yasuní referendum backstory

#nisansadisciplines #nisansaconcepts #yasuní #ecuador #environmentaljustice #ecuadorcrisis
#amazon

Subproject 5 checking in from Ecuador with a roundup of the past year! 🇪🇨

😮News has likely reached you about the recently declared `internal armed conflict` by Ecuadorian President Daniel Noboa, triggered by the escape of two influential drug lords and the forceful takeover of a television station during a live broadcast. This situation, stemming from escalating gang violence, put an end to the time when Ecuador was known as the Island of Peace.

💥In addition to these security challenges, Ecuador confronted a significant political crisis last year, marked by the dissolution of the parliament by former President Guillermo Lasso. This action was widely perceived as an attempt to evade a corruption trial implicating his government in corruption within certain public enterprises.

📢This course of events prompted a call for extraordinary elections on August 20, 2023, which culminated in Daniel Noboa assuming the presidency. The lead-up to these elections witnessed a surge in pre-existing violence, with the most distressing incident being the assassination of presidential candidate Fernando Villavicencio during his campaign on August 9, 2023.

✨Now, the silver lining! Concurrent with the presidential elections, Ecuadorians participated in a referendum on the appropriateness of oil exploration in the Yasuní National Park, a region of vital ecological significance and home to Indigenous peoples in the Ecuadorian Amazon.

🌳The outcome is noteworthy: Ecuadorians voted to cease oil exploration in this region, securing a victory with a majority of 59.14%. This vote holds historic significance, not only for Ecuador but also for the broader Amazon region, especially considering the prevailing environmental degradation and the climate crisis.

🤨Hold the confetti, though. The journey ahead is nuanced. The talk about scrapping oil wells sparks debates on financial viability due to current elevated costs for the military and security. In addition, the initiative also faces local resistance.

👋Stay tuned for our next post diving deeper into the Yasuní referendum backstory

#nisansadisciplines #nisansaconcepts #yasuní #ecuador #environmentaljustice #ecuadorcrisis
#amazon
...

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